Archive for the ‘Savannah Georgia Attractions’ Category

Old Fort Jackson – The Oldest Standing Brick Fort in the US

August 30th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Old Fort Jackson - The Oldest Standing Brick Fort in the USGeorgia’s oldest standing brick fortification is beautifully preserved and located on the Savannah River: Old Fort Jackson, constructed before the War of 1812.

Old Fort Jackson is one of Savannah’s many, must-see National Historic Landmarks. Ordered built by then President, Thomas Jefferson, as part of a national defense system, Old Fort Jackson is named after the one-time governor of Georgia, James Jackson. It saw action in its efforts to to defend Savannah during both the War of 1812 and the Civil War.

Always a strategic area, Old Fort Jackson was constructed atop the site of an older, earthenwork fort built in the mid 1700′s against British invaders. This earlier emplacement was abandoned in 1778, however, after a wave of illness convinced folks that its earth was “unhealthy.”

The Civil War saw Confederate troops using the fort’s defenses against Union forces until December of 1864, when Old Fort Jackson fell during General Sherman’s destructive “March to the Sea”. The Confederate men stationed at the fort did what they could to render the facility unusable to their enemies before retreating, including rigging the front gates to explode and setting the barracks on fire.

Despite this, Old Fort Jackson survived and now you can visit it! Managed by the Coastal Heritage Society, Old Fort Jackson is open seven days a week, offering daily cannon firings, interactive programs, and unique views of Savannah’s riverfront skyline and the Talmadge Bridge. Don’t miss it!

Old Fort Jackson

Open 7 days a week, 9am – 5pm
1 Fort Jackson Rd.
Savannah, GA 31404
chsgeorgia.org/Old-Fort-Jackson.html

Old Fort Jackson Lodging
Like so much of what brings people out for a Savannah vacation, Old Fort Jackson is but a 10 minute drive from McMillan Inn. Our convenient location in the Landmark Historic District of Savannah means that most of what you’ll want to see is easily accessible and just minutes away – often on foot! After all, Savannah is: “America’s best pedestrian city,” and our restored, 1888 Italianate Revival Inn is perfectly situated to make that motto ring true!

Savannah’s Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist

August 16th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Savannah's Cathedral of Saint John the BaptistThe grand architectural beauty and rich history of Savannah’s Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist is affecting beyond words and worth visiting – no matter your personal beliefs.

Construction began on Savannah’s Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist in 1873 and was completed in 1896 – making it oldest Roman Catholic church in Georgia. You might well wonder at why it took so long for such a structure to be built in Georgia, given that the state was established in 1732 and one of the original 13 colonies of the US.

What this set of facts overlooks, however, is the general mistrust for Catholicism that existed in the early days of the US.

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Visit Oatland Island Wildlife Center of Savannah

July 26th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Oatland Island Wildlife CenterLooking for something wild to do in Savannah? How about a visit to the Oatland Island Wildlife Center?

The Oatland Island Wildlife Center of Savannah features 175 acres of maritime forest, freshwater wetlands, and salt marsh habitat, crisscrossed by a 2 mile-long “Native Animal Nature Trail” that affords you the opportunity to view over 60 species of indigenous, North American animals, many of which are considered endangered.

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Savannah’s Georgia State Railroad Museum

June 30th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Georgia State Railroad MuseumIf you’re a railroad enthusiast – and honestly, once you get up close to one of these magnificent machines, who isn’t? – you’ll definitely want to make the Georgia State Railroad Museum part of your Savannah vacation.

The Georgia State Railroad Museum is located at what was once the Central of Georgia Railway Savannah Shops and Terminal Facilities and, as such, is a National Historic Landmark.

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Don’t Miss the 2014 Savannah Theatre Season

June 20th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

The 2014 Savannah Theatre Season is in full swing and, if you haven’t had a chance to look at the schedule, you should do so! This historic venue, the “oldest theater in America,” has a reputation for putting on iconic stage shows that stay with you long after the curtains go down – and the 2014 Season is no exception.

Explore the 2014 Savannah Theatre Season

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Savannah’s Forsyth Park

May 30th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

The famous Forsyth Park fountainSavannah, Georgia is so full of beauty and history that trying to see it all can be overwhelming. One place you do not want to miss, however, is historic Forsyth Park.

The view of the spectacular Forsyth Park Fountain from down Bull Street is one of the most fampus and unforgettable Savannah vistas. Its iconic beauty stands as testament to the careful planning of the 19th century visionaries who saw the park as a gem to be cherished now and into the future.

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Discover Savannah’s River Street

May 19th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Savannah's River StreetRiverside cobblestone streets. Southern hospitality and history mingling with charming storefronts and delectable eateries: Savannah’s River Street.

The busy, nine-block, waterfront stretch along the Savannah River, known as Savannah’s River Street, was once a bustling, gritty wharf area that slowly grew into a district of prosperous cotton warehouses as trade flourished. By the end of the Civil War, however, the area fell into disrepair. It remained run down until the mid-70′s, when the Riverfront Urban Renewal Project was begun.

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Visit the Historic Tybee Island Lighthouse

April 30th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Tybee Island LighthouseLighthouses fascinate us and with good reason – they are iconic, historic, and reach far out over the waves to help save lives – Tybee Island Lighthouse is no exception.

Tybee Island Lighthouse has been an iconic part of the Georgia shoreline in one form or another since 1736, having been built when Georgia was but the 13th colony of England’s holdings in the New World.

At first Tybee Island Lighthouse had no light at all and was just a 90 foot tower meant to serve as a guide on the horizon during the day. Built near the shore of the island, it wasn’t too long before this early tower was destroyed by a storm and had to be rebuilt.

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Slavery and Freedom in Savannah at the Jepson Center for the Arts

March 17th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Slavery and Freedom in SavannahWhen most of us think of slavery in the south, we picture rural plantations and fields of cotton but a new book and an exhibit at the Jepson Center for the Arts in Savannah, Slavery and Freedom in Savannah, looks at the subject of urban slavery.

While rural slavery on the plantations was a more visible fact, urban slavery was instrumental to America’s slave-based economy. The story of the lives of the African Americans – both free and enslaved — who built and worked at various homes in and around Savannah are documented in the exhibit and book, shedding new light on this often forgotten yet integral part of American history.

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Bonaventure Cemetery – Sacred Icon of Savannah

February 27th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Bonaventure CemeteryLocated just east of Savannah on a quiet bluff overlooking the Wilmington River, sits the Bonaventure Cemetery, sacred icon of Savannah.

Boneventure is probably most famous now for the image of it on the cover of John Berendt’s book, “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.” The cover showed the now-famous “Bird Girl” statue, whose new-found fame forced it to be moved to the Telfair Museum of Art for safe keeping – but Bonaventure Cemetery has more to it than just an appearance on a popular book cover.

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